Andrew Hoefling

Speaker | Mentor | Coder | Leader

At the end of my last project I spent some time getting touch gestures to work on a WPF application. This was surprisingly easy and difficult at the same time. This will be part 1 of a 2 part blog series which focuses on Multi-Touch in WPF applications. Part 1 will focus on simple multi touch events and part 2 will dive into a more complicated real world example with an open source project I forked on github.

Azure Mobile App Services sets you up with a nice template builds all of your boiler plate code. When I went through the setup on the Azure Portal and downloaded the template locally I ran into all sorts of issues with iOS not working in my Xamarin.Forms project. Everything appears to work without issue on Android but I couldn’t get the MobileServiceClient to load, the app would just crash. After lots of digging and playing with the tools provided I figured out what was wrong. It appears the template was missing some platform specific code for iOS.

Managing project dependencies can be complicated, from handling shared libraries, 3rd party libraries, homebrew libaries and forks of open source libraries. There is a need for just about every project regardless of size to manage these libraries with a Package Manager. Fortunately most 3rd Party Libraries are on NuGet or some other public Package Management feed so we don’t have to manage them. Getting your private packages on your own private NuGet server is now easier then ever and with the tools built into VSTS you can create automated builds that deploy changes to your libraries to that package management server.

You have decided to take your first stab at iOS development and you do not have a physical Mac machine running OS X but you have a device running iOS. You can still develop for iOS while you wait for that mac mini to come in the mail. After going through this process and developing in it I don’t recommend anyone to develop in this unless it is temporary while you wait for you mac to arrive.

I am Andrew Hoefling and I am a Software Engineer. This is my introduction blog post about my development blog. I am a C#/.NET expert or at least I play one on TV and I want to share my knowledge with co-workers and anyone that stumbles upon my little corner of the web.