Andrew Hoefling

Speaker | Mentor | Coder | Leader

The single biggest problem I have seen while developing any type of mobile app is how do we handle offline sync? On most projects I have worked on this has been punted as a problem that isn’t worth the devs time until we are close to release. While this is a bad idea in my opinion, the team does not need to freak out about handling offline sync. It is easier than we make it for ourselves, today’s take away is “Don’t freak out, mobile sync is easy”

When building a test framework it is sometimes useful to be able to write test code against DbSet<T> objects. Since DbSet<T> implements IDbSet<T> it is relatively easy to wire up a mock for your entity. Before we jump in let’s go over an important concept in the Moq framework.

When you set out to create a new web application in ASP.NET you have 2 major choices:

  • MVC
  • Web API

Today we are going to take a look at creating necessary APIs for user authentication.

  • ASP.NET Core Identity
  • Authentication
  • Saving Cookies
  • Generating Tokens
  • Create Scaffolding for Web API

As a consultant I work on several different projects throughout a calendar year and I may need to circle back to old projects. It is very useful for me to have a virtual machine I can just boot up to pick up exactly where I left off. This also makes creating a new development enviornment super easy for me, I just spin up a new virtual machine and I am ready to go.

In Xamarin.Forms or Xamarin Android your project might get to a point where you run into issues with the java build failing for what appears to be no reason. At first glance the OutOfMemoryException may make no sense at all, but toggling some simple settings will get you back up and running.

On my Xamarin.Forms project I am using an Untrusted Certificate (SSL) just for development on my local machine and with the development servers. This has caused several headaches and issues while trying to code around it on VPN. The latest issue that has popped up was exceptions being thrown regarding untrusted certificates when trying to access images off of the development server.

At the end of my last project I spent some time getting touch gestures to work on a WPF application. This was surprisingly easy and difficult at the same time. This will be part 1 of a 2 part blog series which focuses on Multi-Touch in WPF applications. Part 1 will focus on simple multi touch events and part 2 will dive into a more complicated real world example with an open source project I forked on github.

Azure Mobile App Services sets you up with a nice template builds all of your boiler plate code. When I went through the setup on the Azure Portal and downloaded the template locally I ran into all sorts of issues with iOS not working in my Xamarin.Forms project. Everything appears to work without issue on Android but I couldn’t get the MobileServiceClient to load, the app would just crash. After lots of digging and playing with the tools provided I figured out what was wrong. It appears the template was missing some platform specific code for iOS.

Managing project dependencies can be complicated, from handling shared libraries, 3rd party libraries, homebrew libaries and forks of open source libraries. There is a need for just about every project regardless of size to manage these libraries with a Package Manager. Fortunately most 3rd Party Libraries are on NuGet or some other public Package Management feed so we don’t have to manage them. Getting your private packages on your own private NuGet server is now easier then ever and with the tools built into VSTS you can create automated builds that deploy changes to your libraries to that package management server.