Andrew Hoefling

Speaker | Mentor | Coder | Leader

Xamarin.Forms provides a simple control for adding tabs to any application but the standard implementation has some limitations. With a little knowledge of how iOS and Android work you can start creating beautiful Tabs in your Xamarin.Forms applications that support custom colors and custom text.

When building Xamarin Apps there is no easy out of the box mechanism to control your enviornmental settings such as web service url as your app migrates through the different environments such as Development, Staging and Production. With a little work we can add a configuration file very similar to how you would update a web.config or appsettings.json in an ASP.NET or ASP.NET Core application

Xamarin.Forms 3.2.0 released a new feature that is sure to be a favorite among many developers. The TitleView allows developers to quickly customize the Navigation Bar like they never had to before. You can easily add custom images, controls, content, etc. Before the TitleView it was a very long process of creating a custom renderer and platform specific implementations.

AppCenter Push Notifications is an exciting new technology for handling Push Notifications in any mobile app. I use AppCenter quite a bit with my Xamarin projects so using AppCenter was a natural choice.

This is Part 2 in a 3 part blog series discussing AppCenter Push Notifications

Recently I was working on a Xamarin.Forms app that required push notifications for both iOS and Android. I started implementing Azure Notification Hub and was recommended by my friend James Montemagno that App Center supports push notifications. James quickly produced an amazing blog post that documents push notification and your options in Xamarin.

The single biggest problem I have seen while developing any type of mobile app is how do we handle offline sync? On most projects I have worked on this has been punted as a problem that isn’t worth the devs time until we are close to release. While this is a bad idea in my opinion, the team does not need to freak out about handling offline sync. It is easier than we make it for ourselves, today’s take away is “Don’t freak out, mobile sync is easy”

As a consultant I work on several different projects throughout a calendar year and I may need to circle back to old projects. It is very useful for me to have a virtual machine I can just boot up to pick up exactly where I left off. This also makes creating a new development enviornment super easy for me, I just spin up a new virtual machine and I am ready to go.

In Xamarin.Forms or Xamarin Android your project might get to a point where you run into issues with the java build failing for what appears to be no reason. At first glance the OutOfMemoryException may make no sense at all, but toggling some simple settings will get you back up and running.

Azure Mobile App Services sets you up with a nice template builds all of your boiler plate code. When I went through the setup on the Azure Portal and downloaded the template locally I ran into all sorts of issues with iOS not working in my Xamarin.Forms project. Everything appears to work without issue on Android but I couldn’t get the MobileServiceClient to load, the app would just crash. After lots of digging and playing with the tools provided I figured out what was wrong. It appears the template was missing some platform specific code for iOS.