Andrew Hoefling

Speaker | Mentor | Coder | Leader

Deploying a .NET Framework WebJob to Azure is easy enough, but as of writing this blog the tooling is lacking for .NET Core. Many organizations are making it an initiative to migrate their .NET Framework projects to .NET Core which is a good idea. The tooling limitation for .NET Core WebJobs should not be a barrier, following this guide you will be able to deploy your .NET Core WebJobs to Azure

Hosting apps in the cloud is common practice due to it's ease of use and performance that smaller organizations may not have on their own. Why not host DNN in the cloud? If you follow our guide here you can be up and running in Microsoft's Azure Web App in a matter of minutes.

The single biggest problem I have seen while developing any type of mobile app is how do we handle offline sync? On most projects I have worked on this has been punted as a problem that isn’t worth the devs time until we are close to release. While this is a bad idea in my opinion, the team does not need to freak out about handling offline sync. It is easier than we make it for ourselves, today’s take away is “Don’t freak out, mobile sync is easy”

Azure Mobile App Services sets you up with a nice template builds all of your boiler plate code. When I went through the setup on the Azure Portal and downloaded the template locally I ran into all sorts of issues with iOS not working in my Xamarin.Forms project. Everything appears to work without issue on Android but I couldn’t get the MobileServiceClient to load, the app would just crash. After lots of digging and playing with the tools provided I figured out what was wrong. It appears the template was missing some platform specific code for iOS.